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The Journal of John Long
About the Early Days
Newspaper Articles
Read about the Early Days
1893 - 1965
1966 to Present
REPRESENTING THE LARGEST COLLECTION OF 2X2 HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS ON THE INTERNET

Letterhead used by workers titled Christian Conventions

Perry, Oklahoma Conv, 1942

Early Workers
George Walker
Revised May 16, 2017

George Walker's Family & Background
George Walker's Family Tree
Passenger List for Ship Columbia when George came to America
Notes on George Walker's Early Days in America- Oct. 29, 1979
Early Days Account - Feb 16, 1988
Early Life History - Sept 6, 1975
Excerpt from Funeral Service for Charlie A. Hughes, Aug. 19, 1972
Excerpts from Horace Burgess' Letter Dec. 1981

Statement to the US Selective Service, 1942 (Photo of letter)
Transcript of 1942 US Selective Service Letter
Letter from Major Neal M. Wherry, Selective Service System to Olga Hawkins re: George Walker (Click Here for Photo)

Signature of George Walker

Sermons, Notes & Quotes of George Walker

Newspaper Announcement of Geo. Walker's Death, Nov. 8, 1981
Last Days, Death and Funeral
Last Wishes & Will
Funeral Account

Statement re Colorado, Dec. 1, 1938
Rebuttal To Accusation He "and Few Others Started This"
Statement of the Meeting at West Hanney, July 19-21, 1930

Letter about Black Stockings

Letter from Uncle George Walker (101 yrs old) Dec 21, 1977


George Walker's Family & Background

George Walker was born on February 12, 1877 and died on November 6, 1981, age 104 years, 8 months and 25 days. His middle name is not known. According to the 1905 Workers List, George Walker went into the work in 1899. He was probably the last one of the original group of workers to die.

When George Walker was eleven years old, he came home from Methodist Sunday School to find that his Mother had passed away of tuberculosis (per George Walker at 1971 Bessemer, Alabama Special Meeting). Obviously, George Walker was not being raised in the 2x2 fellowship or he would not have been at Sunday School.

At Tom Patterson's funeral on November 7, 1964, George Walker said, "My own father said, 'I would rather see you a corpse.' Yet, he was a kind and good father. My Mother died when I was eleven years of age, and my father was both father and mother to us, and I have very kind feelings toward him. He was a religious man, but he didn't understand. He thought from a human standpoint; he didn't have confidence in God..."

George Walker's parents, John and Jane (Fausett/Fawcett) Walker, were both from Northern Ireland. They had eleven (11) children.

At age 101 years, George Walker wrote his nephew Thomas Howard Walker a letter dated December 21, 1977. He told what he knew about his grandparents: "All I know is that your grandfather was a soldier in the British Army during the days of Napoleon, at the time of the battle of Waterloo….I was about 6 when he died. I can remember him. He may have inherited or purchased the farm your father and I were born on. He divided (it) between his two sons, my father and our Uncle Tom. There were two houses on it…Later our parents bought another small farm that adjoined ours. This gave them about 25 acres, and that didn’t bring a large yearly income, but they succeeded to rear 10 children and to give them some education that helped them to make their way in the outside world. We wonder how they did, the land was good for potatoes, and oats and these were wholesome food. We were never without sufficient food."

After his mother died in 1888, George was sent to live with some strangers: "Not long after we had revivals there, and I went up to the front to profess, and I went as far as I could. I meant it then, but I was disappointed because I realized I was not changed. I was just the same as ever. Later on I had to go away and live with strangers. During those ten years, from 11 to 21, I had some very serious thoughts in my mind." (Geo. Walker at Funeral Service for Charlie A. Hughes, August 19, 1972)

Reporting the words of George Walker at the 1910 Crocknacrieve convention: "I remember quite well when I was 11 years of age going down to the church in the village there [meaning Ballinamallard] and going and kneeling at the penitent form, for I was anxious to get converted as ever anybody was. I wanted to be a christian. I remember kneeling there and seeking to get converted, as that was all I heard about it. I was told I was converted there, but though only 11 years old I remember having a clear feeling that I had got nothing at all. I was told and taught after that I was a Christian, but I knew nothing about it. I remember after that going from Enniskillen to Garvary Church three miles distant.

"I longed to know that I was a Christian. I yearned after it, as I did not want to live the shallow superficial life that I saw around me. There seemed to be some change made on me then, but I could not get away from the Scripture which says ‘Deny yourself and take up the cross and follow Me.’ I was led to measure myself by other people and to soothe my conscience. I went to sleep saying ‘I am as good as other people and surely they all can’t be wrong.’ I anxiously tried to be a Christian, but could not do so for covetousness, selfishness, and worldliness, and I knew that so long as I was possessed of that spirit I could not go to heaven.

"I went on that way till I was 21 and the only way I thought I was a Christian was by playing into the devil’s hands and measuring myself by other people. the wonder was that I ever could have been such a fool as to think I was a Christian in face of what God tells me. As I look around this district and see the impression left by the religious people of the day I am very glad that ever the Lord pointed out to me and enabled me to walk the Jesus way."
(Impartial Reporter July 7, 1910)

George Walker was 21 in March, 1898 when he first heard Wm. Irvine preach. He made his choice on April 11, 1898 either going to a train, while on a train or upon leaving a train at a railway station (the accounts differ). He became a full-time worker in 1899. At the funeral service of sister worker, Ida Hawkins in March, 1978, he said, "On Easter Monday I met a man (Willie Gill) that told me of his desire to go as the disciples did. I could see that was the right way." 

George Walker stated that he remembered "when he was being made a Methodist preacher, a book on theology was put into his hands to study. The word ‘theology’ meant a discourse about God and he was going to learn about God and instead of learning of Him. That was the way he was being made a Methodist preacher, and HELL WILL BE FULL of these preachers, and I would have been there along with them if my eyes had not been opened to God’s true way. I longed and was anxious to become a Methodist preacher, and I would be one tomorrow if I could see one way of hope in the Bible that I could ever get to heaven." (Impartial Reporter, July 14, 1910)

At Charlie Hughes funeral August 19, 1972, George Walker said: "Seventy-four years ago last March, [1898] I went down near Charlie's home, and going to that place changed my whole course of life, and it is the cause of me being here today. Charlie was only 14 then; I was 21. I was being taught to preach to other people. I was living in the city. I happened to be working in the same business, the same department store, as another person connected with Charlie, who belonged to the same denomination as Charlie, and they told about some people who came in and preached to them, and it changed their lives. One was Charlie's older brother. These people had listened to a strange preacher and believed what he said. They couldn't explain it, but a great change had come in their lives. Because I had been taught to preach a little, they thought I could go down and help those people. They were like new starters.

"When I went down, I had no conception of who I would be meeting. I didn't take it very seriously. I just went with another man who was the leader. Before I fell asleep that first night, I heard some things that put thought in my mind....What spoke to me when I went near Charlie's home was a man in his mid-thirties that was a farmer, and had worked very hard to get the best farm in the community...When he was on the farm, the thought came into his mind, 'Suppose the Lord would want me to sell this farm that I have worked so hard to get, and give away the money, and go out and preach the Gospel like the disciples? Would I be willing to do it?' The other man with me, higher up in the denomination and in the business world, said, 'That is a foolish idea...' I had never heard of any doing it, nor any suggesting...Here is the first man in the world that I had heard talk of doing this. He did it. He went out to preach the gospel, scattered the money, and preached to within a few days of his 88th birthday." [the man in his mid-thirties was Willie Gill, who went in the work in 1900]

As George Walker told the story to a group on February 16, 1988: "A woman where he worked lived some miles from the city and told of men coming and preaching in her neighborhood, and of a number of young people leaving the church and following those men. She said some of those young Methodist preachers should go down and get those young folk straightened out and back into the church. So it was planned that one Saturday George and another young man in the church, who also was active, should go to that neighborhood and find out more about this way.

"They took a train and went to the home of one of those young people, a young man who had one of the best farms in that part. They had a visit about the Bible, and this young man named Willie Gill, about 28 years old, told them 'while working around the farm, I thought of Jesus' words to that young man in Luke 18:18 who asked what he should do to have eternal life. Jesus answer: Sell what you have and give it away and come and follow me. I wondered if Jesus should asked me to sell this farm and scatter the money and start out in this ministry as Jesus asked that man, would I be willing for it?'

"The young Methodist with George said, "That is a piece of foolishness. Who ever heard of a man having to sell a farm, or all, and then start out homeless and penniless in his ministry?" George said it struck a tender spot in him as he had quite a sermon on this subject: What Lack I Yet? Times when he preached this, that there is something lacking in your life that cuts you off from heaven, perhaps some secret thing in one's life no one knew of, and they would have to cut it out or they were wrong in some way. George said that often when he preached this some of the members had patted him on the back and said, "You're going to go places in the Methodist church." But now George said, "I felt this was what I had lacked, and it was the true meaning of this passage.

"Willie Gill lived with his mother and trained horses for the gentry to use in hunting with foxes. He would buy a horse for about $100, train it, and sell it for about $300; and he would bring $100 and place it on the table and say, 'Mother, I sold a horse. Here is something for you.' Soon Willie Gill sold that farm; and scattered all and went out in this ministry and continued until his death.

"Willie invited George and his fellow Methodist lay preacher to spend the night, but the Methodist fellow had had enough and he left. George spent the night and on Sunday morning was in a meeting and stayed for dinner. After dinner he had to return to the city. They took him in a 2-wheel jaunting cart to the depot. He got on the train, and sat in one of those compartments like a small room, like they had on the trains at that time. He thought that what he heard was right, but if he went in for this, he would lose all his friends in the Methodist church; but then when he came to die, they could do nothing for you. Some people got on the train, came into his compartment, and did a lot of talking. They had been imbibing something, and that makes people talk a lot.

"Finally, they arrived in the station. George got off the train and was walking across the platform, and said in his heart, "O God, I am willing." There came an assurance of the approval of God right then and there. That was April 11, 1898. It was not long until George began in this ministry in Scotland". (Account of George Walker's Early Days-1988)

George Walker was "a former resident in the Ballinamallard district." (Impartial Reporter, July 7, 1910) Crocknacrieve (which is the name of a home) is in the Ballinamallard district, which is a part of Enniskillen. It was probably Edward Cooney who introduced George Walker to William Irvine, as according to the Impartial Reporter, George was employed by Edward Cooney's father. "Mr. George Walker, who used to be a draper's apprentice in Mr. W. R. Cooney's employment, spoke last." (Impartial Reporter July 28, 1910) A draper is a person who deals exclusively in selling clothes, fabric for making clothes, and sewing accesories. A drapery shop is an establishment which sells little else besides clothes, fabric, and sewing materials. Ed Cooney's father, Wm. Rutherford Cooney, was a successful merchant in Enniskillen who owned a drapery shop at No. 4 High Street, Enniskillen.

Perhaps Mr. Cooney also owned a store in Dublin. Reportedly, Geo. Walker worked at a store in Dublin called McBirneys, which closed many years ago; the building now contains the Virgin Megastore. However, the inscription "McBirneys" is engraved in concrete on the building. [Photo of McBirneys] When he was 21, Geo. Walker resigned from the store where he worked. He may have been learning the drapery business. Geo. Walker said, "I spent the teen years of my life working in a store. The man I worked for was very religious, but his whole idea of a successful life was making money. Anyone that didn't make money, he called a "straw" man. It was a contemptible expression. He would emphasize money would give one importance." (Hector MN Convention Oct. 1970)

There is a Dublin landmark pointed out today by the friends, as the site where George Walker came to his momentous decision to take a stand with Wm. Irvine and his workers. George Walker was at the Broadstone Railway Train Station when he surrendered his life and said to God, "If this is what it takes, I'm willing for it." He often told this story...while he "was walking across the platform...said in his heart, "O God, I am willing." There came an assurance of the approval of God right then and there. That was April 11, 1898." (Account of George Walker's Early Days-1988)

Broadstone is within walking distance from McBirneys. It was the Broadstone Railway Train Station until mid-1940, when it was converted to a bus depot, and like a lot of other places in Dublin is rumored to be haunted. Tradition has it that the original railway station was built over a cemetery, thereby upsetting the spirits of the dead. Today it is little more than a large overnight parking and servicing facility for Dublin City and Country buses. It is not a station where passengers embark or dis-embark. The address is: Dublin Bus/Provincial Bus, Broadstone Depot, Dublin 7 Ireland.

The Impartial Reporter Newspaper had this to say about George Walker:

"At the morning meeting, which continued for almost three hours, the principal speaker was George Walker, a native of the Co. District of Fermanagh. ‘George,’ as he is called by everyone—not even the leaders get the courtesy title ‘Mister’—is a polished speaker, of refined appearance. As a young man, when in the late Mr. W. R. Cooney’s establishment in Enniskillen, he was a good looking youth and he has preserved his good looks. His address was learned, interesting, and full of force. He was in the place once occupied by Wm. Irvine, the pioneer of this great movement, a man of magnetic power, rugged, a strong personality, a forceful speaker, and at one time worshipped as a leader of men and women. George Walker spends most of his time in America, but has not got the American twang. He will shortly visit the Continent. He has a charming manner." (Impartial Reporter, July 9, 1931)


George Walker refers to ten children in his family in the letter quoted below, so presumably one died at an early age, perhaps Ellen. He was the longest living Walker sibling.  His obituary stated:  "He was preceded in death by six sisters and four brothers.  Surviving are two nieces, Dorothy Forsyth of Hollywood, Ireland, and Rebecca Walker of Enniskillen, Ireland, and also grandnieces and nephews, all in northern Ireland."

At age 101 years, George Walker wrote his nephew Thomas Howard Walker a letter dated December 21, 1977.  He told what he knew about his grandparents: "All I know is that your grandfather was a soldier in the British Army during the days of Napoleon, at the time of the battle of Waterloo….I was about 6 when he died. I can remember him. He may have inherited or purchased the farm your father and I were born on. He divided (it) between his two sons, my father and our Uncle Tom. There were two houses on it…Later our parents bought another small farm that adjoined ours. This gave them about 25 acres, and that didn’t bring a large yearly income, but they succeeded to rear 10 children and to give them some education that helped them to make their way in the outside world. We wonder how they did, the land was good for potatoes, and oats and these were wholesome food. We were never without sufficient food."

After his mother died in 1888, George was sent to live with some strangers: "Not long after we had revivals there, and I went up to the front to profess, and I went as far as I could. I meant it then, but I was disappointed because I realized I was not changed. I was just the same as ever. Later on I had to go away and live with strangers. During those ten years, from 11 to 21, I had some very serious thoughts in my mind." (Geo. Walker at Funeral Service for Charlie A. Hughes, August 19, 1972)

Reporting the words of George Walker at the 1910 Crocknacrieve convention: "I remember quite well when I was 11 years of age going down to the church in the village there (meaning Ballinamallard) and going and kneeling at the penitent form, for I was anxious to get converted as ever anybody was. I wanted to be a christian. I remember kneeling there and seeking to get converted, as that was all I heard about it. I was told I was converted there, but though only 11 years old I remember having a clear feeling that I had got nothing at all. I was told and taught after that I was a Christian, but I knew nothing about it. I remember after that going from Enniskillen to Garvary Church three miles distant. I longed to know that I was a Christian. I yearned after it, as I did not want to live the shallow superficial life that I saw around me. There seemed to be some change made on me then, but I could not get away from the Scripture which says ‘Deny yourself and take up the cross and follow Me.’ I was led to measure myself by other people and to soothe my conscience. I went to sleep saying ‘I am as good as other people and surely they all can’t be wrong.’ I anxiously tried to be a Christian, but could not do so for covetousness, selfishness, and worldliness, and I knew that so long as I was possessed of that spirit I could not go to heaven. I went on that way till I was 21 and the only way I thought I was a Christian was by playing into the devil’s hands and measuring myself by other people. the wonder was that I ever could have been such a fool as to think I was a Christian in face of what God tells me. As I look around this district and see the impression left by the religious people of the day I am very glad that ever the Lord pointed out to me and enabled me to walk the Jesus way." (Impartial Reporter July 7, 1910)

George Walker was 21 in March, 1898 when he first heard Wm. Irvine preach. He made his choice on April 11, 1898 going or leaving the platform of a railway station or while aboard on a train there--accounts vary. He became a full-time worker in 1899. At the funeral service of sister worker, Ida Hawkins in March, 1978, he said, "On Easter Monday I met a man [Willie Gill] that told me of his desire to go as the disciples did. I could see that was the right way." 

George Walker stated that he remembered "when he was being made a Methodist preacher, a book on theology was put into his hands to study. The word ‘theology’ meant a discourse about God and he was going to learn about God and instead of learning of Him. That was the way he was being made a Methodist preacher, and HELL WILL BE FULL of these preachers, and I would have been there along with them if my eyes had not been opened to God’s true way. I longed and was anxious to become a Methodist preacher, and I would be one tomorrow if I could see one way of hope in the Bible that I could ever get to heaven." (Impartial Reporter, July 14, 1910)

At Charlie Hughes funeral August 19, 1972, George Walker said: "Seventy-four years ago last March, [1898] I went down near Charlie's home, and going to that place changed my whole course of life, and it is the cause of me being here today. Charlie was only 14 then; I was 21. I was being taught to preach to other people. I was living in the city. I happened to be working in the same business, the same department store, as another person connected with Charlie, who belonged to the same denomination as Charlie, and they told about some people who came in and preached to them, and it changed their lives. One was Charlie's older brother. These people had listened to a strange preacher and believed what he said. They couldn't explain it, but a great change had come in their lives. Because I had been taught to preach a little, they thought I could go down and help those people. They were like new starters.

"When I went down, I had no conception of who I would be meeting. I didn't take it very seriously. I just went with another man who was the leader. Before I fell asleep that first night, I heard some things that put thought in my mind....What spoke to me when I went near Charlie's home was a man in his mid-thirties that was a farmer, and had worked very hard to get the best farm in the community...When he was on the farm, the thought came into his mind, 'Suppose the Lord would want me to sell this farm that I have worked so hard to get, and give away the money, and go out and preach the Gospel like the disciples? Would I be willing to do it?' The other man with me, higher up in the denomination and in the business world, said, 'That is a foolish idea...' I had never heard of any doing it, nor any suggesting...Here is the first man in the world that I had heard talk of doing this. He did it. He went out to preach the gospel, scattered the money, and preached to within a few days of his 88th birthday." [the man in his mid-thirties was Willie Gill, who went in the work in 1900]

As George Walker told the story to a group on February 16, 1988: "A woman where he worked lived some miles from the city and told of men coming and preaching in her neighborhood, and of a number of young people leaving the church and following those men. She said some of those young Methodist preachers should go down and get those young folk straightened out and back into the church. So it was planned that one Saturday George and another young man in the church, who also was active, should go to that neighborhood and find out more about this way.

"They took a train and went to the home of one of those young people, a young man who had one of the best farms in that part. They had a visit about the Bible, and this young man named Willie Gill, about 28 years old, told them 'while working around the farm, I thought of Jesus' words to that young man in Luke 18:18 who asked what he should do to have eternal life. Jesus answer: Sell what you have and give it away and come and follow me. I wondered if Jesus should asked me to sell this farm and scatter the money and start out in this ministry as Jesus asked that man, would I be willing for it?'

"The young Methodist with George said, "That is a piece of foolishness. Who ever heard of a man having to sell a farm, or all, and then start out homeless and penniless in his ministry?" George said it struck a tender spot in him as he had quite a sermon on this subject: What Lack I Yet? Times when he preached this, that there is something lacking in your life that cuts you off from heaven, perhaps some secret thing in one's life no one knew of, and they would have to cut it out or they were wrong in some way. George said that often when he preached this some of the members had patted him on the back and said, "You're going to go places in the Methodist church." But now George said, "I felt this was what I had lacked, and it was the true meaning of this passage.

"Willie Gill lived with his mother and trained horses for the gentry to use in hunting with foxes. He would buy a horse for about $100, train it, and sell it for about $300; and he would bring $100 and place it on the table and say, 'Mother, I sold a horse. Here is something for you.' Soon Willie Gill sold that farm; and scattered all and went out in this ministry and continued until his death.

"Willie invited George and his fellow Methodist lay preacher to spend the night, but the Methodist fellow had had enough and he left. George spent the night and on Sunday morning was in a meeting and stayed for dinner. After dinner he had to return to the city. They took him in a 2-wheel jaunting cart to the depot. He got on the train, and sat in one of those compartments like a small room, like they had on the trains at that time. He thought that what he heard was right, but if he went in for this, he would lose all his friends in the Methodist church; but then when he came to die, they could do nothing for you. Some people got on the train, came into his compartment, and did a lot of talking. They had been imbibing something, and that makes people talk a lot.


"Finally, they arrived in the station. George got off the train and was walking across the platform, and said in his heart, "O God, I am willing." There came an assurance of the approval of God right then and there. That was April 11, 1898. It was not long until George began in this ministry in Scotland" Account of George Walker's Early Days-1988)

George Walker was "a former resident in the Ballinamallard district." (Impartial Reporter, July 7, 1910) Crocknacrieve (which is the name of a home) is in the Ballinamallard district, which is a part of Enniskillen. It was probably Edward Cooney who introduced George Walker to William Irvine, as according to the Impartial Reporter, George was employed by Edward Cooney's father. "Mr. George Walker, who used to be a draper's apprentice in Mr. W. R. Cooney's employment, spoke last." (Impartial Reporter July 28, 1910) A draper is a person who deals exclusively in selling clothes, fabric for making clothes, and sewing accesories. A drapery shop is an establishment which sells little else besides clothes, fabric, and sewing materials. Ed Cooney's father, Wm. Rutherford Cooney, was a successful merchant in Enniskillen who owned a drapery shop at No. 4 High Street, Enniskillen.

Perhaps Mr. Cooney also owned a store in Dublin. Reportedly, Geo. Walker worked at a store in Dublin called McBirneys, which closed many years ago; the building now contains the Virgin Megastore. However, the inscription "McBirneys" is engraved in concrete on the building. [Photo of McBirneys] When he was 21, Geo. Walker resigned from the store where he worked. He may have been learning the drapery business. Geo. Walker said, "I spent the teen years of my life working in a store. The man I worked for was very religious, but his whole idea of a successful life was making money. Anyone that didn't make money, he called a "straw" man. It was a contemptible expression. He would emphasize money would give one importance." (Hector MN Convention Oct. 1970)

There is a Dublin landmark pointed out today by the friends, as the site where George Walker came to his momentous decision to take a stand with Wm. Irvine and his workers. George Walker was at the Broadstone Railway Train Station when he surrendered his life and said to God, "If this is what it takes, I'm willing for it." He often told this story...while he "was walking across the platform...said in his heart, "O God, I am willing." There came an assurance of the approval of God right then and there. That was April 11, 1898." Account of George Walker's Early Days-1988)

Broadstone is within walking distance from McBirneys. It was the Broadstone Railway Train Station until mid-1940, when it was converted to a bus depot, and like a lot of other places in Dublin is rumored to be haunted. Tradition has it that the original railway station was built over a cemetery, thereby upsetting the spirits of the dead. Today it is little more than a large overnight parking and servicing facility for Dublin City and Country buses. It is not a station where passengers embark or dis-embark. The address is: Dublin Bus/Provincial Bus, Broadstone Depot, Dublin 7 Ireland.

According to the 1905 Workers List, George Walker went into the work in 1899. The Impartial Reporter Newspaper had this to say about George Walker:

"At the morning meeting, which continued for almost three hours, the principal speaker was George Walker, a native of the Co. District of Fermanagh. ‘George,’ as he is called by everyone—not even the leaders get the courtesy title ‘Mister’—is a polished speaker, of refined appearance. As a young man, when in the late Mr. W. R. Cooney’s establishment in Enniskillen, he was a good looking youth and he has preserved his good looks. His address was learned, interesting, and full of force. He was in the place once occupied by Wm. Irvine, the pioneer of this great movement, a man of magnetic power, rugged, a strong personality, a forceful speaker, and at one time worshipped as a leader of men and women. George Walker spends most of his time in America, but has not got the American twang. He will shortly visit the Continent. He has a charming manner." (Impartial Reporter, July 9, 1931)

Photos of George Walker



Notes on George Walker's Early Days in America
 (as related on Monday, October 29, 1979)

Today was a big and special day.  Charles Steffen brought George Walker to Kermit and Margaret Bierbaum's.  Four Missouri sister workers also came:  Olive Sloan, Ruth Sunderland, Susan Peter and Doris Coleman. Susan and Doris are new.  Doris just started in the work this afternoon.  We all had dinner together and George told us of his first days in America.  His memory of dates, places and people, and their relatives is most remarkable.

He and a couple others arrived in New York harbor Sept. 14, 1903. Having some steerage, they were required to go to Ellis Island to go through immigration.  To his knowledge there were no friends or workers in America previous to this.  To wait for questioning at the Island was long.  They arrived about 10:00 a.m. and didn't get through until 4:00 p.m.  No lunch served.  Women with children and elderly people had a very hard day standing and waiting.  One of the friends in Ireland had a relative that lived in New York, a young lady, Mrs. McIntire.  She and her husband received a letter from this lady in Ireland, asking that they would meet the boat.  The McIntires said some time later that they were of the mind not to, but a voice seemed to urge Mrs. McIntire to go, so she and her husband stood calling out the name "George Walker" from behind a fence there at Ellis Island until George heard them.  They took them home for the night and later the McIntire's professed -- the first of those in America that George knew of.

It wasn't long until George went up to Bridgeport, Conn. to look up a lady whom he met on the boat.  This lady's father was a high class Presbyterian preacher that seemed reluctant in asking George to go along to his fancy church, since George was of questionable financial status, etc., so the man suggested that he go to a nearby tent meeting. George said he preferred that anyway.  It was a Holiness group and after the Sunday morning service, George looked up the leader, which he knew to be from Ireland.  After they talked awhile, the man asked if George wouldn't like to preach the afternoon service also.  George thought this indicated a need for a preacher in this group, which he that day had filled.  So his first Sunday in America he spoke to 300 to 400 people.

From Bridgeport, Conn. George went to Springfield, Mass.  They were around Springfield for a couple of weeks but only made many friends. Later workers went back and were received by these people and many professed. Hugh Matthews was one that went this later time.  George said 100 people professed at one time in Hugh's meetings.

George went on to Philadelphia from Springfield, Mass. and got a bed in a Salvation Army place for 154.  Next morning he saw the company he had been keeping and the bed bugs and decided it might be best to move on.  He looked up another man he had met on the boat, who in the course of conversation asked where George spent the night.  When he replied, "The Salvation Army," the man was horrified and took George to a better place and paid a week's board for him.  This man was Mr. McKee.  George said he looked him up as a last resort contact because the man had told of plans to become a Baptist minister.  Besides that, he reminded George of an old companion of his that had turned back.  But this man later professed.  George said, "You just cannot tell whom the Truth will claim."  Beyond that, Mr. McKee worked for Andrew Abernethy's mother in a mill owned by Andrew's uncle.  When George was introduced to Mrs. Abernethy, Andrew was a small child, crawling on the floor.  This was the day before Christmas, 1903.

From Philadelphia, George went to Pittsburgh, Pa. and was able to have meetings in mission halls and speak for mission groups.  It was a common thing in those days for people to preach for a mission group. In May 1904, Jack Carroll, Sarah Rogers, Jean Weir*, and several others arrived in this country, and again in Dec. 1904, a group including Jack Jackson.  Willie Weir, Dave Linus (sic - should be Lyness), and others came.

Willie Weir started out preaching in mission halls as a guest preacher also, and after one meeting the following August, a man expressed great interest in what Willie had said, and asked Willie to finance a place for him to stay the night.  Willie had only 14 cents, but gave the man a dime and went on.  Willie hadn't eaten all day. Toward evening he found a telephone pole and decided this might be a good a place as another to spend the night.  He lay down in the grass beneath it and fell asleep, looking up that pole and singing an old hymn,

"I can sleep anywhere with Jesus watching over me" 

Verse 1: "Anywhere with Jesus I can safely go,
Anywhere He leads me in this world below,
Anywhere without Him dearest joys would fade,
Anywhere with Jesus I am not afraid. 

Chorus:  Anywhere!  Anywhere!  Fear I cannot know;
Anywhere with Jesus I can safely go. 

Verse 5: Anywhere with Jesus I can go to sleep,
When the dark'ning shadows 'round about me creep;
Knowing I shall waken, never more to roam,
Anywhere with Jesus will be home, sweet home."

Next day he spent walking and looking about.  Willie saw a little boy playing outside a bread store.  Since his Scottish pride wouldn't allow him to go in and buy 4 cents worth of bread, he asked this little fellow if he wouldn't buy it for him.  The little boy agreed to bring out the merchandise and in a bit presented Willie with 4 penny chocolates.  Willie gobbled them down without sharing since it was his first meal in 3 days.  That night he was trying to unfasten a gate to go in and sleep in a cornfield.  The farmer was obliging enough -- he let him go in and sleep in the cornfield. 

Next day, feeling very hungry, Willie asked a farmer if he didn't need some help with work.  The farmer put him to sorting apples, but first asked if he'd had lunch.  Willie replied, "No," so he was given some dinner scraps, which were heartily received.  He went to sorting apples, then in the barn, and wrote a penny postcard to Dave Linus. Dave upon receiving it, bicycled about 20 miles to look Willie up. Inquiring at the farm house, one knew the apple man's name.  Dave went back to the barn and quietly walked up behind Willie and placed his hand on his shoulder.  Willie slowly turned around and said, "I suppose you'll be saying, 'What doest thou here, Elijah?'"

The first convention in North America was in Toronto, Ont. in 1906. A 15' x 40' tent and a rented house were used.  This was the only convention that year.  In 1907, the rented house had bed bugs so the women spent only one night there.  Dining, meetings, and men's sleeping were all in the tent.  The first convention in Illinois was in Chicago in 1907.  This convention took in all the Midwest.  About 60 people attended.

Somewhile later I asked George about the two men which came with him in 1903.  They were Irvine Weir and William Irvine.  Sadly both men got off on the wrong track.  George said that Irvine Weir had a weakness for divine healing and later on in life wrote his sister that nothing could hurt him because he served God.  Before the letter arrived, he fell off a ladder, rose up and said, "I'm all right," then died.  He  had said that some of the friends, who got killed couldn't have been doing God's will.  George said, "I have been left alone in many things."

* * * * * *

Excerpt of Letter from Horace Burgess, December, 1981: The McIntires lived in a 4 room apt, they rented another apt for the workers for 2 weeks $4. They took those workers to their home and fed them, and then to the apt. Mr. McIntire had to take the day off from work to meet them. It was Tom and John Tuft's parents that lived in Bridgeport, Conn. where he went. Mr. Tuft was a staunch Presbyterian. Later Mr. Tuft said, "I have always believed in Jesus as our Saviour." George said, "Your idea of a Presbyterian preacher--Jesus was not that kind of a preacher." Mr. Tuft said, "Why I'm a good Presbyterian." George said, "There is no such thing." It was like hitting him with a hammer.

Mrs. Tuft had professed in Ireland, but was engaged to him, so married him. Later he went to a convention and during testimonies he got to his feet and just said, "I will arise and go to my father." George said that many would not have thought much about those words, but he knew that this man meant that. It was the way he made his choice. They only had two sons, and both went in the work. Tom was killed in an accident in Detroit Dec. 9, 1953, It was quite a story.

That man in Phila. that George met was a Baptist preacher whom he met on the boat coming over. Every night they had preaching, and when George spoke to the crowd some of the Catholics would tackle them, but this Baptist preacher took up for George and gave him his address, and told him if he ever was in Philadelphia to look him up. He was the one who went out and rented a room for George for a week, but I understand it was about two years after he had met him on the boat.

George came to Horace Burgess' home when Horace was about 7 years old.

TTT Editor Note: Per Ellis Island records, May Carroll arrived in the USA on May 16, 1904 with Sarah Rodgers (not Jean Weir who didn't go in the work until 1906.)


Account of George Walker's Early Days
(Written February 16, 1988)

George Walker at times, often sitting around the dinner table, told of his early days when he first came to this country, and of his beginning.

George was raised a Methodist. He was born in Enniskillen, Ireland in a two-room house. He said that when he was about 8 years old, on a Sunday Morning, his mother prepared him and his sister to go to Sunday school. She wrote a note to the Sunday school teacher saying she was sorry that she was not able to come that morning. When George and his sister returned home, their mother had died. Some of the neighbor women came in and washed and dressed the body, and laid it out on the bed. That afternoon George sat in the bedroom door looking on his mother's form, cold in death, and wondered if he had died where would his soul be, having a fear of God.

When he was about 13 he joined the Methodist church and later was active in the church. The minister told him that he ought to go into the ministry, that he would not make much money, but there was honor and prestige connected with that profession and he would be called Reverend. He went to work in a large department store. Some of the men he admired there and felt he would like to be like them, and others he feared not wanting to become like them; but as time passed he saw in himself some of the same marks trying to get in that he despised.

A woman where he worked lived some miles from the city and told of men coming and preaching in her neighborhood, and of a number of young people leaving the church and following those men. She said some of those young Methodist preachers should go down and get those young folk straightened out and back into the church. So it was planned that one Saturday George and another young man in the church, who also was active, should go to that neighborhood and find out more about this way.

They took a train and went to the home of one of those young people, a young man who had one of the best farms in that part. They had a visit about the Bible, and this young man named Willie Gill, about 28 years old, told them 'while working around the farm, I thought of Jesus' words to that young man in Luke 18:18 who asked what he should do to have eternal life. Jesus answer: Sell what you have and give it away and come and follow me. I wondered if Jesus should asked me to sell this farm and scatter the money and start out in this ministry as Jesus asked that man, would I be willing for it?'

The young Methodist with George said, "That is a piece of foolishness. Who ever heard of a man having to sell a farm, or all, and then start out homeless and penniless in his ministry?" George said it struck a tender spot in him as he had quite a sermon on this subject: What Lack I Yet? Times when he preached this, that there is something lacking in your life that cuts you off from heaven, perhaps some secret thing in one's life no one knew of, and they would have to cut it out or they were wrong in some way. George said that often when he preached this some of the members had patted him on the back and said, "You're going to go places in the Methodist church." But now George said, "I felt this was what I had lacked, and it was the true meaning of this passage.

Willie Gill lived with his mother and trained horses for the gentry to use in hunting with foxes. He would buy a horse for about $100, train it, and sell it for about $300; and he would bring $100 and place it on the table and say, "Mother, I sold a horse. Here is something for you." Soon Willie Gill sold that farm; and scattered all and went out in this ministry and continued until his death.

Willie invited George and his fellow Methodist lay preacher to spend the night, but the Methodist fellow had had enough and he left. George spent the night and on Sunday morning was in a meeting and stayed for dinner. After dinner he had to return to the city. They took him in a 2-wheel jaunting cart to the depot. He got on the train, and sat in one of those compartments like a small room, like they had on the trains at that time. He thought that what he heard was right, but if he went in for this, he would lose all his friends in the Methodist church; but then when he came to die, they could do nothing for you. Some people got on the train, came into his compartment, and did a lot of talking. They had been imbibing something, and that makes people talk a lot.

Finally, they arrived in the station. George got off the train and was walking across the platform, and said in his heart, "O God, I am willing." There came an assurance of the approval of God right then and there. That was April 11, 1898. It was not long until George began in this ministry in Scotland. (Account of George Walker's Early Days-1988)

Lizzie McGregor worked in a mill about 10 hours a day and belonged to a religious group common there then. Their preacher told them, "There are two preachers going to speak on our street corner meeting tonight." It was George's first night in the work. Lizzie said, "I don't remember what was said, but I remember after the meeting our preacher said 'Now we will have to go back to the hall and pray half the night to undo the harm those men have done. Lizzie, will you come back and pray with us?' I told them, 'I can't, I'm going to sleep. I've worked all day in the mill.'"

She never saw nor heard anymore for over a year. Then one day her preacher told them, "There are two of those preachers having meetings in a hall nearby. Take my advice and stay away and treat them with cool contempt." Lizzie replied, "We can go an hear them, but we don't have to swallow their doctrine." Lizzie and some other girls decided to go. The workers were John Doak and his companion. She sat in that meeting and listened and she was assured that this is the Truth, this is right, and I'm coming every chance I get. That was the beginning for Lizzie McGregor.

George told of his coming to this country in the early years of this century. He was in Liverpool, England and three planned to come together. There was first class passage - the most expensive, then there was second class, which was cheaper, and then steerage. The cost of a ticket from Liverpool to New York was $27.00 and they got three tickets. They left Liverpool on a Friday night and sailed across the Irish Sea to Belfast, where on Saturday they loaded cargo and passengers. About five of them left and sailed out around the north end of Ireland and into the North Atlantic Ocean. The sea was raging and rough. They tried to stay on deck but they were all sick and after awhile they went down into the lower part of the ship where they had been given bunks, and tried to rest. They were sick all day Sunday and Monday. George said, "On Tuesday I felt we have got to get up and walk around or we won't be able to walk off the ship when we get to New York.”

There was a large room on ship where preachers and speakers could speak to the crowd. George had an opportunity to speak. Some heckled them, but a Baptist preacher from Philadelphia, PA took George's part. He gave George his address and said, "If you are ever in Philadelphia, look me up and if I can do anything to help you, I will."

Finally it was announced they would be arriving in New York on a Monday morning about 7 o'clock. All prepared to disembark. They let the First Class passengers off first and then the Second Class passengers. The steerage passengers were loaded into boats and taken to Ellis Island for inspection, so George and his companions went there. There were crowds of people there to meet their relatives. Finally, about 11 o'clock the customs officers had examined them, asking all their questions, and told them they could go.

They approached a steel partition barrier of grillwork, and as they were about to go out the gate, they heard someone calling their name. They did not know a soul, did not know there would be anyone there to meet them, but they found this man and his wife there to greet them. They were not professing, but her sister belonged to what they called, "I believe the brethren." The sister in Ireland had written to her telling her of these three men, strangers, arriving on this boat; and asked her sister in New York to meet them and take care of them.

At first they felt, 'we won't do it' but then she felt 'what will my sister think? We can meet them.' So her husband took off from work, and they rented an apartment for two weeks for these three strangers. They told them, "We will take you to our home and you can have dinner, then we will take you to this apartment since we only have a 4-room apartment and no room to keep you overnight." The name of this couple was George and Edith McIntyre, and they were the first to profess in the workers' meetings. Not long afterward, his brother Dan and wife professed out on Staten Island.

George Walker was born February 12, 1877 and died November 6, 1981 about 6:00 PM near Philadelphia, PA. He was 104 years old.


Excerpt from Sermon of George Walker
McCordsville, Indiana
September 6, 1975

I grew up in that false religion...When I was 11 years of age, there were deep impressions made on my mind by my mother's death, and I had many serious thoughts at that age. Most of all was the thought of where would I be if I died? I had learned enough then that I wasn't fit for heaven. I went up and professed in one of the revivals in that church, and it was an awful disappointment to realize that I am not any different. Some young ones who stand up in convention and don't have an understanding from the Lord are in a difficult position. When I was 15, they had revivals. I thought the last time, "I didn't get anything, but I am determined to get something now," and for awhile I did seem to have something, but inside of a year, when I was 16 and before I was 17, I was terribly troubled along two different lines.

I read the New Testament, the words of Jesus, and this great denomination that was so proud of its numbers and wealth, it is not like this that I read, and I searched for those that were more like the New Testament, and for some that didn't do but for others it did, but what hindered me was they were just as greedy and covetous. When I was 21, I suffered to know if there wasn't something like the New Testament preachers, for these preachers were living in fine homes. But what worried me most was about myself--I didn't have what I read either; I didn't have the love of God, that love for other people. I realized the older I was getting, the more I was getting to love the world. I was encouraged along that line, actually two lines. A man who was a great preacher became the Lord Mayor of London, and he told me if I would just become a preacher that I could be like him.

During that time they got me to be a preacher, then a lay preacher, and they showed me the advantages. They said, "If you become a preacher in this denomination, you may not make as much money, but look at the high position you will have! You would be called Reverend, you know." Somehow that didn't appeal to me for I had read so much about Peter and Paul, so when I was 21, the Lord in His providence and mercy brought me in touch with people.

I was supposed to preach to these people, but I learned something from them that made me feel I don't want to preach to them. They told me how they became saved. The man I spent the night with said, "I was working on my farm today and the thought came to my mind, if the Lord wanted me to sell this farm and give away the money and preach like the apostles did, would I be willing to do it?" He didn't say that he would be willing. Instead he said to me, "Well that is foolishness. I never heard of such a thing as that!" That made an impression on me.

Well, we had to make up sermons in the Methodist church. I had one on the rich young ruler, and I would get some compliments from that sermon. But when I was alone, there was a voice saying, "You are not telling all. I never heard of anybody doing that." I emphasized one thing that I liked--the love of God. But when it came to "sell all," I never heard of anyone doing it. Would that be possible? Would that be the right way?

I came back later and got a good deal more the second time alone and I left that home on Easter Monday, 77 years ago, and sat on that train alone and there was a voice speaking. The compartments were filled with other passengers, and it being a holiday it was noisy, but I was not hearing anything others were saying. Here I was professing to be a Christian for five years or more, and I am more swallowed up with what is in the world, but when I come to the close of life, how will I meet God?

I thought of what would bring great popularity. My own father was doing a little preaching himself and what a disappointment it was to him! I thought of the business I was in, some things not exactly straight. It would bring trouble with your closest relatives; it would make you a very odd person. Some things were getting clearer. It would be hard to fall out with my natural father who had been so good to me, but on the Judgment Day, if he would be living, he could do nothing for me. I didn't like the thought of facing God like that. I saw the hard side-- losing your job maybe, and the popularity, the hardness. But it was the thought of eternity that was upon me.

There was another world. No matter how long you live in this world, there is another world, and amongst that crowd on that holiday, there was that in my heart, "I will surrender to Thee and trust You for whatever it means. I don't know what it means, but I am willing and I will trust You to give me the strength." I had the feeling, "Will I feel different the next morning about it?" I had the greatest joy, there was the desire to do the Lord's will. One love killed the other.

I don't say I was perfect after that, but before this century came, and away back 76 years ago I was fighting a battle of making another decision. That was to go out and live as the apostles lived. I listened to a man speaking of Peter in a small meeting and thought maybe I could be like Peter. I wasn't filled with the thought that I could be as perfect as Jesus, but like those who followed Him. I told the Lord I was willing 76 years ago.

When I told my father and others, they said, "It was crazy; it couldn't be done; you will die of starvation; you couldn't preach without a salary." I have been trying it for 76 years. What Jesus said, it can be done. He has supplied the temporal needs and given me the strength to continue. Wouldn't that help you to trust the future? It wasn't long until the old Serpent was saying you will never be much a preacher, but another little voice said, even if that is true, "If you live as you have begun now, you will have proved to honest people that know you that God's Word can be depended upon, no matter how few they are."

I want to be buried at the least possible expense at the nearest convenient place, and I don't want anyone speaking an eulogy; all I want you to say is, "The one lying there believed in Jesus and put Him to the test, and the Lord enabled him to keep on." You can say that, but not glorify me humanly.

I thought of what would bring great popularity. My own father was doing a little preaching himself and what a disappointment it was to him! I thought of the business I was in, some things not exactly straight. It would bring trouble with your closest relatives; it would make you a very odd person. Some things were getting clearer. It would be hard to fall out with my natural father who had been so good to me, but on the Judgment Day, if he would be living, he could do nothing for me. I didn't like the thought of facing God like that. I saw the hard side-- losing your job maybe, and the popularity, the hardness. But it was the thought of eternity that was upon me.

There was another world. No matter how long you live in this world, there is another world, and amongst that crowd on that holiday, there was that in my heart, "I will surrender to Thee and trust You for whatever it means. I don't know what it means, but I am willing and I will trust You to give me the strength." I had the feeling, "Will I feel different the next morning about it?" I had the greatest joy, there was the desire to do the Lord's will. One love killed the other.

NOTE: 77 years ago was the year 1898; Easter Sunday was April 2, when he professed
76 Years ago was 1899, when he entered the work.


Excerpt from Funeral Service for
Charlie A. Hughes, August 19, 1972
at
Downings, Virginia Convention Grounds

(Items in parenthesis added)

George Walker:  “He being dead yet speaketh." You all know who that was. He died as a martyr at the hands of his own brother... You know what is spoken in other parts of the Scripture. It says, "The blood of Jesus speaks better things than the blood of Abel." Jesus' blood speaks of the atonement for our sins. Abel's blood was the result of the jealousy of his brother because Abel worshipped God in the way he had been taught by his parents, the same as his brother had been. But Cain had other thoughts about it. He brought the fruit of the ground which is typical of us thinking we can do something of ourselves. We can't pay our way. We can't work our way. When Abel sacrificed that lamb, it was proof that he knew of the Lamb of God that would come to take away the sin of the world.

I don't know that it is necessary to say any more about our brother, Charlie. I can endorse all our brothers have said. Sixty-five years ago we met in Toronto, Canada. During those years we have been closely associated. Seventy-four years ago last March, (1898) I went down near Charlie’s home, and going to that place changed my whole course of life, and it is the cause of me being here today. Charlie was only 14 then; I was 21.

I was being taught to preach to other people. I was living in the city. I happened to be working in the same business, the same department store, as another person (Edward Cooney?) connected with Charlie, who belonged to the same denomination as Charlie, and they told about some people; who came in and preached to them and it changed their lives. One was Charlie's older brother…These people had listened to a strange preacher (William Irvine?) and believed what he said. They couldn't explain it, but a great change had come in their lives. Because I had been taught to preach a little, they thought I could go down and help those people. They were like new starters.  When I went down I had no conception of who I would be meeting. I didn't take it very seriously.  I just went with another man who was the leader. Before I fell asleep that first night, I heard some things that put thoughts in my mind.

When I was eleven, my mother died. I was away at Sunday School when she died. I said "good-bye" before I went. She was very low with T.B., and we realized that. She told us what to tell the teacher. When we came back a couple of hours later, she was gone. That was the first time that deep, serious questions arose in my mind. I was blamed before my mothers death that I didn't have as many feelings as my older brother and sister did, but it became very strong that Sunday afternoon--serious thoughts came.  I remember where the body was laid out and I sat in the doorway where I could see her face still in death.  I remembered times when I had caused her sorrow and grief, and I was pretty sorry about that, but above all those questions was one, "Where would I be myself if I had died?" I had learned enough to know there had to be some change to go to Heaven. I knew I wasn't fit to go to Heaven. I learned there was one place where you would be happy and the other where there would be torment. I had very serious thoughts.

Not long after we had revivals there, and I went up to the front to profess, and I went as far as I could. I meant it then, but I was disappointed because I realized I was not changed. I was just the same as ever. Later on I had to go away and live with strangers. During those ten years, from 11 to 21, I had some very serious thoughts in my mind. I tried to be satisfied with the religion I was in. As I grew older, I couldn't shut my eyes from seeing that that I had was not like what I read in the New Testament. For a good few years before I went to Charlie's home part, I was often terribly troubled that I was in fellowship with something not like the New Testament, not like Jesus and the Apostles. Others thought I was living such a good life outwardly that I should become a preacher. Even then, I would be troubled about it.

One special friend, the preacher, was trying to influence me to be a fulltime, preacher, getting ordained. He said, "It is not likely you will make as much money as you would in the business you are in, but it will be a much higher social standard; you will have the title before your name, and letters after your name." But what he was telling me was turning me against it. I told him that I didn't feel called for that. As I read of Jesus and the Apostles, they had no social standing. They were despised, as Paul said, the "offscouring." They didn't have high social position. Those I was associated with had the best home and the best salary. And with all my preaching to others, I felt I did not have what those men of the New Testament had. I did not have that love that constrained Jesus to give His life for nothing in this world.

What spoke to me when I went near Charlie's home was a man in his mid-thirties that was a farmer (Willie Gill? Footnote 1) and had worked very hard to get the best farm in the community, but before he let us go to sleep, he told us a little of his thoughts.  When he was working on the farm, the thought came into his mind, "Suppose the Lord would want me to sell this farm that I have worked so hard to get, and give away the money, and go out and preach the Gospel like the disciples?"  Would I be willing to do it?

The other man with me, higher up in the denomination and in the business world, said, "That is a foolish idea to sell his farm, and give away the money and go out to preach."  You know why it didn't look so ridiculous to me?  I had a great sermon on the rich young ruler that I got a lot of compliments on. They did not know that when I would go away and get down on my knees a voice would come and say, "You are not telling all that is in that."  Something was telling me that it meant more than that. I had never heard of any doing it, nor any suggesting it. When it came to the word "sell", I would say "give up your tobacco."  I listened to the greatest preachers in this world, from this country even, and I never heard anyone explain that. They could explain the Bible--but not that.

Before I went to bed, it was the memory of what I preached myself that brought it home. Here is the first man in the world that I had heard talk of doing this. He did it. (Willie Gill?) He went out to preach the gospel, scattered the money, and preached to within a few days of his 88th birthday, exhorting others that had decided through him. He was taken sick in a Sunday morning meeting, and before the next Sunday his body was in the grave.

You can see that Charlie's life has memories way back to me. I don't know that I could say I saw him then, but he saw me. He was taking our number as we came down from the city. Light years later I saw him again. He had made his choice for the Lord and later went forth to preach. He started out over sixty-six years ago, preaching in Scotland. (1906)

* * * * * * * * *
Footnote 1:  The farmer was probably WILLIE GILL.  Willie Gill professed through Wm. Irvine. He and Wm. Irvine were the oldest of the workers and both were born in 1863. Willie was reported to be a wealthy landowner, or stood to inherit a large farm, and his going into the Work in 1900 made quite an impact on his community.  He was the elder worker in the British Isles from 1914 until his death in 1951 at the age of  88.  He is listed as starting in the work in 1900 and two other Gills, Jennie and Emma are also shown as starting that year.  (Accounts of the Early Days Footnote 8, author unknown)   Jack Jackson stated at Willie Gill's funeral on June 5, 1951, that by his calculations, it was 53 years and 8 months since Willie and some others at Rathmolyon made their choice saying, "Lord what will Thou have me to do?"   This dates back to October, 1897.

NOTE:  1951 (the year of Willie’s death) minus 88 years the farmer in this Account lived =1963, which was Willie Gill’s birth date.


George Walker
Special Meeting - Brooklyn, New York
March 18, 1973

When I came to America, I spent my first night at Erie Basin [Brooklyn, NY]. It wasn't like it is now. These people didn't have a great apartment. These people had a heart.  It was in my heart to come to America, but we didn't have more than five dollars at the time and knew that was not enough. We decided that if it was meant for us to come the Lord would see to it, and He did. 
 
We had no organization to sponsor us. We were asked by the Ellis Island officials what we intended to do. We explained our work, and that we gave our service free. The official said, “We need you.” We were just trying to decide where to get a room when I heard my name called. Here was a family who heard we were coming. They had said amongst themselves that they didn't want to identify themselves with us. They knew how we lived and preached. They had a position now in a religious sect and were up in the world, but the man said he heard a little voice telling him to come and meet us. 

... I'm glad I made my choice seventy-five years ago. I was on a train with other people there, but I didn't hear what they were saying, I was talking to myself, “If I make my choice, I won't be popular in this life, I'll lose the fellowship of my sisters, it will destroy my social life, I'll disappoint my father.” Then the thought came to me that someday it will all end and what will I have? I came to the conclusion it would be better to make my choice and be with the Lord. When I got off the train I walked down that platform and I made my choice in my heart, “I don't understand it all, but I'm willing.” There was a feeling of peace that came into my heart but I thought what will I feel like in the morning? I thought it would be like all the other experiences. The next morning I still had that peace inside.  


Excerpts From Horace Burgess' Letter

Dec. 1981

The McIntire's lived in a 4-room apt. so went and rented another 4-room apt. for the workers for two weeks @ $4.00.  They took the workers to their home and fed them, and then to the (------?).  Mr. McIntire had to take the day off from work to meet them.  It was Tom and John Tuft's parents that lived in Bridgeport, Conn. where he went.  Mr. Tuft was a staunch Presbyterian.  Later Mr. Tuft said, "I have always believed in Jesus as our Saviour."  George said, "Your idea of a Presbyterian preacher, Jesus was not that kind of a preacher." Mr. Tuft said, "Why, I'm a good Presbyterian."  George said, "There is no such thing."  It was like hitting him with a hammer.  Mrs. Tuft had professed in Ireland, but was engaged to him, so married him.  Later, he went to a convention and during testimonies he got to his feet and just said, "I will arise and go to my Father."  George said that many would not have thought much about those few words, but he knew that this man meant that.  It was the way he made his choice. They only had two sons, both went in the work, and Tom was killed in an accident in Detroit, Dec. 9, 1953.  It is quite a story.

The man in Philadelphia that George met was a Baptist preacher, whom he met on the boat coming over.  Every night they had preaching, and when George spoke to the crowd, some of the Catholics would heckle them, but this Baptist preacher took up for George and gave him his address, and told him if he was ever in Philadelphia to look him up. He was the one who went out and rented a room for George for a week, but I understand it was about two years after he had met him on the boat.

George came to Horace Burgess' home when Horace was about 7 years old.


George Walker's 1942 Statement to the U.S. Selective Service
(Typed Transcript)

Click Here to view an original copy of George Walker's Statement.

"In accordance with the suggestion made to us at our recent interview in the Office of the Director of Selective Service, Washington, D.C. that a further statement be submitted outlining, in greater detail than has heretofore been given, certain facts regarding the foundation, belief and activities of the Church we represented, as Ministers - this for the purpose of enabling the Local Draft Boards to correctly classify Ministers of this Church throughout the United States who are subject to the Selective Service Laws.

"We take this opportunity to state that during the closing years of the last century and the first years of this century a number of people in the British Isles and in America were exercised in heart and mind, through their study of the Scriptures, in regard to the methods of preaching and worship in the several churches of which they were then members. They were deeply concerned about spiritual things, and became fully convinced that there should be a return to the methods and purposes taught and carried out by Christ and His first disciples. This conviction led to frequent earnest conversations and studies on the subject, which in turn led to religious meetings, and in due time a number of these people went forth to devote their lives to the preaching of the Gospel according to the teaching and example of Christ as given in the New Testament, i.e., "two by two" and without salary or making appeals for financial assistance, putting implicit trust in God and His promise that as they "sought first the Kingdom of God" their natural needs of food and raiment "would be added to them".

"As a result of this step, many people expressed their desire to be in fellowship with such preachers and this led to regular gatherings together of small assemblies in homes for worship and study of God's word. The reason for meeting in homes was primarily because it is scriptural, the Christians during the first centuries of the Christian era met regularly for worship in homes, which fact is also borne out and supported by church history. Thus after serious consideration, the leaders were confident that in their efforts to follow the early Christians they should form church gatherings in homes; therefore no church property or real estate has been acquired by purchase or otherwise, and for this reason incorporation and registration under a denominational name has not been necessary. The meetings continue to the present time in homes and are under the guidance of local Elders. Baptism by immersion and the weekly observance of the Lord's Supper is taught and practiced.

"In the year 1903 Ministers of this Christian body began their labors in the United States and in the year 1904 in Canada. In these and subsequent years through the preaching of the Gospel, assemblies were formed in homes as already described. In the year 1906 the first annual conventions were held in North America, and from this beginning the number of Ministers in North America has grown to over nine hundred - about equally divided between men and women; the assemblies for regular worship to over three thousand; and the annual conventions to over one hundred.

"One Minister in each field is the Overseer for that field - to whom the other Ministers look for counsel and from whom they accept guidance. In most instances a State constitutes a field.

"Those who enter this Ministry must first establish very definitely their religious character and have fulfilled the other qualifications considered necessary. They must be upright and of high principle - having proven their ability to earn their living in an honorable way - and must have taken an active part in the Church meetings regularly attended. If and when they are considered to have qualified, they are then appointed and assist an experienced Minister in an evangelistic work and in ministering to assemblies of Christians. From the time of appointment, Ministers devote their entire time and talents to the work of the Ministry. If for sufficient reason anyone thus accepted later proves to be unworthy or unfit he cannot continue in this Ministry.

"At the annual Christian Conventions arranged at suitable times of the year in each State - and which practically one hundred percent of the members are present, all matters pertaining to methods of work, doctrine, discipline of members, local elders, ministry, etc., are fully considered and settled.

"Definite fields of labor within each State are arranged for all Ministers by the Overseers to whom the Ministers are responsible. Names, addresses, and fields of labor in the Gospel of all Overseers and Ministers are available at any time.

"Overseers, who over a long period of years have devoted all their time to Evangelistic, Pastoral and other activities of Christian service, exercise - in fellowship with each other - a general supervision over the Ministry and membership in the United States.

"The undersigned is one of such Overseers, and would be glad to furnish any further information regarding the foregoing which may be considered to be helpful or desirable.

Signed:

"George Walker"

Confirm George Walker's signature.



George Walker's Statement re: Colorado

Dec.1, 1938

For a length of time in the state of Colorado conditions have existed which have occasioned great trouble and sorrow amongst the Christians and those who are preaching the gospel. A number of workers met near Denver to consider possibilities for the removal of the afore-mentioned trouble, and the whole situation was freely discussed. Disturbance of true fellowship had come about and George Walker agrees that he assume responsibility and blame for this unwise attitude and action. He also acknowledges that he is responsible for those who with him took part in this sad disturbance in fellowship which has brought so great pain and confusion amongst the people of the Lord. George Walker asks forgiveness for having erred in this matter and manner. George Walker further agrees to do all in his power to right the wrong that has been done; and to correct wrong and misleading impressions which have found place in the minds of God's people because of things told to them. It is understood that workers associated with George will confess their error in having part in this matter, make amends and apologies and take the postition of endeavoring to promote unity amongst saints and workers.

On the part of workers in Colorado, E. Cornock, who has the care of the work in the state, wishes to acknowledge that between the workers in Colorado and those in other fields, a lack of close co-operation has existed. E. Cornock accepts some blame for the part he has had in this and asks forgiveness for the same, wherein any way the Colorado workers have failed to keep as closely in line with other workers as they should. It is their wish and purpose to correct this.

Be it further understood that in the case of future trouble either party may have the opportunity and privilege of appealing to other older workers believed to be impartial who could make necessary decisions.

May every child of God remember that even in New Testament times serious difficulties crept in amongst God's people, but that the wise souls held firm in faith through dark and bright, and it is the sincere prayer of the undersigned that forgiveness and grace may prevail and that the admonition of Barnabas may be followed. He exhorted them with purpose of heart they would cleave unto the Lord. Acts 11:23.

P.S. It should be understood that this statement is only intended for those who have been affected by the above matter and it is not intended that it should be put into the hands of those who have no knowledge of the trouble.

Signed--

John Hardie           George Walker
James Jardine       
E.J. Cornock
John S. Jackson     Wm. Wilkie
                                Hugh R. Matthews


.Dead at 104; Long-time Gospel Preacher George Walker 

November 8, 1981
North Penn Reporter
Lansdale, Pennsylvania


Services will be Tuesday afternoon for George Walker, 104, of White Oak Road, North Wales.  He died Friday at North Penn Hospital, Lansdale, where he had been a patient the past week.  Born in County Fermanagh, Ireland, he was the son of the late John and Jane Walker.
.
Mr. Walker came to Philadelphia in the fall of 1903 and was a non-denominational gospel preacher.  He made many friends in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, and also across the U.S., Canada and other countries.  He never married or maintained his own home, staying all his life in the homes of his numerous friends.  In more recent years, he made his home with Mr. and Mrs. George F. Morris, of the White Oak road address.
.
He was preceded in death by six sisters and four brothers.  Surviving are two nieces, Dorothy Forsyth of Hollywood, Ireland, and Rebecca Walker of Enniskillen, Ireland, and also grandnieces and nephews, all in northern Ireland.
.
The R.L. Williams Jr. Funeral Home, Skippack, is in Charge of Arrangements..

TTT Editor's Notes:  The two nieces, Dorothy Forsyth of Hollywood, Ireland, and Rebecca Walker of Enniskillen, Ireland, are daughters of George Walker's brother John and wife Mary Ann (Gracey) Walker.


Account of George Walker's Last Days, Death and Funeral

George was born Feb. 12, 1877, and died Nov. 6, 1981.  Age 104 years, 8 months and 25 days.

George was in fairly good health and active until the Quakertown conv. In early August, 1980.  Immediately after the convention there was a noticeable decline in his physical strength and mental capacity.  It was a gradual decline for about a year, but became more pronounced about the end of Sept. '81.  At that time he was in the hosp. 18 days, then back to the Fred Morris residence where he was cared for by the brother workers until Oct. 30th, when he was again taken to the North Penn Hospital at Lansdale with congestive heart failure and other complications.  On Mon. Nov. 2 he had a bad turn and was critical until he died at 6 P.M. Fri., Nov. 6.  Three of the brother workers took turns staying with him at the hosp. and were allowed to spend the nights in the room with him.  The staff in the hospital seemed to treat him as someone "special" and gave him tender loving care.

The funeral was Tues. 2 P.M. with a viewing from 1 till 2 at the R. L. Williams funeral home about 10 miles from No. Wales.  The undertaker estimated there were more that 400 at the funeral, including 42 workers:  All the Pennsylvania staff except Julia Brown who is attending conventions in the Caribbean, plus Irvine Pearson (Ireland), Norman Henderson (England), Andrew Abernethy, Murray Keene, Earle Newmiller, Sherman Farrar, Harry Johnson, Carson Cowan, Howard Nussbaum, Don Reynolds, Philip Anderson, Robert Flippo, Edward Beasley, George Alaprandi, Bessie Hawkins, Louise Woods, Janette Graves, Christine Gordon, Adele Naef, Florene Clark, Virgie Wheeland, Betsy McEachron, Judy O'Connel, Sandra Shaw, Lilly Sweatt, Sarah Meade and Cynthia Morgan.

The service started with all the workers singing 333 "When life is ended", then Norman Henderson prayed.  Arnold Brown read an open letter entitled "My Wish" that George had written about ten years ago expressing how he would like his funeral conducted, hopin all would be kept simple and inexpensive and nothing said that would glorify the human, but that the glory would go to the One who had enabled him to be what he was.  Arnold also read a verse that George had often quoted: Luke 6:38 and made a few remarks about how well that had worked in George's life and experience.

Murray Keene spoke of his long association with George, and what his counsel and letters had meant to him.  He still has several letters in his possession, the oldest one dates back to 1936.

Irvine Pearson:  II Thess. 2:16, "Now our Lord Jesus Christ, and God our Father, sho hath given us everlasting consolation".  The world can't claim him, but he is our God.  Irvine spoke of  George's early days in the ministry and the beginning of the Work.

Andrew Abernethy spoke of George coming to Philadelphia 78 years ago this month, and having his first mission near Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell. Said the gospel he and his companion preached promised liberty and independence from the bondage of sin, false religion and wrong doctrine.

All the workers sang number 28 "Faintly the Shadows," and Carson Cowan closed in prayer. Pall Bearers were:  Earle Newmiller, Sherman Faffaf, Willie Jones, Tom Nussbaum, Clinton Goff and Leigh Bledsoe.

Burial in North Wales cemetery in the Fred Morris family lot where Earle Newmiller read I Thess. 4 verses 15 to 18 and prayed.



George Walker's
Last Wishes &Will
--  My Wish --

It is my desire that when I am called home my body will be buried in the nearest convenient place to where I have left it; with the least possible expense and that my friends (workers and saints) will not come long distances to the funeral.  I have the hope that during the years I have been in the harvest field the words the Lord has given me to say to others and the example He has enabled me to give has made an impression on their hearts and they will not need to look at the body after I have left it, or even have a photograph to have me in their minds and I wish that those who will conduct the funeral will not say any thing calculated to glorify the human for all I am and all the help I have been to others has been through His indwelling presence and I would desire the glory to go where it belongs. "In my flesh dwells no good thing."

Any money that may be in my possession was given for the spread of the gospel and I wish the workers to use it for this purpose

Signed:   George Walker
No Date Given



Funeral Service of George Walker

The funeral service of our beloved brother, George Walker, was conducted in Williams Funeral Home at Skippack, Pa.  Interment was at Green Lawn Cemetery, N. Wales, Pa., Nov. 10, 1981.  (He was born Feb. 12, 1877 in Co. Fermanagh, Ireland.)  There were 42 workers present and a large number of friends.

The service began by all the workers singing Hymn No. 333, “When Life is Ended.”

Norman Henderson prayed.  Arnold Brown spoke briefly.  He read a letter written by George about ten years ago, expressing his wishes that when he was called “Home”, he would desire to be laid away with the least possible expense, at the nearest convenient place and not to glorify himself but glorify the Lord.  He spoke of Luke 6:38.  This is not for eternal reward, but this means what is fulfilled in this life.  As we give of our best now we’ll receive abundance even in this life as the love and care was bestowed upon George.

Murray Keene:  It is a privilege to be present today.  George is not here.  This is just the tabernacle in which he dwelt.  “The memory of the just is blessed” and is precious to us.  I received a letter in 1936 from George.  He mentioned a brother who had died and said, “He has not lived in vain – because his testimony and counsel will help many in dark days.”  Also he wrote a letter to our family after a death, and said, “The infirmities in this body help us to value the new body.”  When George was 70 years old, he said, “When strength fails and is not what it used to be, use it where it is needed most.”  He said he was now living on borrowed time.  One is careful with anything they borrow and use it as should be.  All credit should be given to that indwelling presence and no credit to self.  The parents in a home had cared for an invalid child.  Someone said that it was a tragedy, but George said, “Look what it has done for the parents.”

Irving Pierson:  II Thess. 2:16.  He mentioned receiving news in Ireland of George’s death.  Norman Henderson and I felt grateful it was arranged to come to show our appreciation and esteem.  We never remember a time when there wasn’t a George Walker.  When we were young, we valued him at our conventions.  He went to Dublin as a young man and received a revelation of the right way in 1898.  Then in 99 he put his life on the altar and went forth to preach the Gospel.  In a few years, 72 others also went forth to preach, scattering to America, Canada, Australia and other countries.  In 1903, George was amongst the first to come to this country.  That verse Heb. 12:29, “Our God is a consuming fire.”  It may refer to all that is false and already crumbling in the world.  But the Lord kindled many little fires in hearts – the spirit of life, love and zeal.  Nothing could stop it.  We look upon one spent, consumed for over 80 years.  We cannot help esteeming, honoring and remembering him for his work’s sake.  Worldly people know there is a God in the universe, but don’t know our God, nor our Father, nor our Lord Jesus.  (II Thess. 2:16).  Paul spoke of the whole family in Heaven and earth – Eph. 3:14, 15.  We learn things in this family that the Father approves or disapproves of which help to develop the sense of values.  George has gone into the eternal realm, asleep in Jesus – not like the natural sleep, but resting under the altar, conscious of the Lord’s presence.  Rev. 6:9, 10, 11.  This seems too wonderful to explain but the zeal of the Lord of Hosts will perform it.  In old age the weak body may hinder us from being able to do, but we can be kind, gentle, humble and meek.

Andrew Abernethy:  It is 78 years since George came to this area not far from Liberty Bell and Independence Hall and brought the GospelThey knew no one, none knew they were coming.  They preached a different Gospel – no college, no salary, no home.  Some came, believed and trusted (amongst whom was one of my family) and as liberty was brought to our country, they were set free from false religion and the bondage of sin.  I thought of Mordecai – Esther 10:3, “….. accepted of the multitude of his brethren, seeking the wealth of his people, and speaking peace to all his seed,” and that was like George.  Jehoiada was 130 when he died – II Chron. 24:16.  He was buried amongst kings, like George who was laid among kings in our hearts.  All points us to Jesus who was laid in another man’s tomb.  I asked some men what they thought was the outstanding memory of George.  One said George often spoke from Psalms.  Felt he knew what they meant – both sides of David’s experience – sorrow and joy.  Another expressed that George emphasized need to keep the secret life right – most vital.  He often showed me where I was wrong when I thought I was right and I appreciated that.  Let us take up the torch which he was forced to lay down.

Hymn 28.  Carson Cowan prayed.

At the grave Earle Newmiller read a portion of scripture and prayed.



Newspaper Coverage of George Walker's Death and Funeral :
1981, Nov 8,  Evening Bulletin (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
1981, Nov 9,  Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
1981, Nov 8/9, North Penn Reporter (Lansdale, Pennsylvania)
George Walker Dead at 104; Long-time Gospel Preacher



TTT Editor's Note:   The following is an account of how and where George Walker professed and how he arrived at the decision to become a worker.  The friends in Dublin often point out to visitors the railway station where George Walker came to his decision, which eventually had a great effect on many lives. The original notes gave the location as "Ewry", but possibly or probably it should read "Newry," Pennsylvania)

Ewry Convention, U.S.A.
(possibly/probably should be Newry, Pennsylvania)
(Probable date: 1974)

George Walker: I will just say a few words from Psalms of Degrees.  They just say what they are. Each one a grade higher than the last. The first one, Psalm 120, starts with the words "In my distress..."  That is the beginning of my testimony. I was in distress because I lacked something, but I did not know what it was.

I was in business and a part time preacher; we were a very religious family, and I often wanted to be a preacher, so I started going to the churches who had no minister and was made very welcome. Many a time they told me my sermon was very good, but I knew I lacked something. One weekend another lay preacher and I went out to the country to preach.

Usually some member had the preachers for the night, as we went Saturday night and came home on Sunday. This particular time we stayed with a very prosperous farmer, who had a lovely place, and during the evening when we were talking about the Bible, he said to me "I don't know what is right, I read one thing in the Bible, and I see something else in the churches. I heard a man say lately, that the way Jesus sent out His disciples was the right way, but no one does it."  The other preacher who was with me said, "Oh that is not for the present day--that was just for the beginning. No need for that now."  I could not understand it either.

In the morning after the service we took the train home, and I was deeply troubled. Next weekend I went back, and we read and prayed, and we both decided what Jesus said was what He intended to be the way for all Eternity; and the farmer said, "If God asked me to sell my farm and go forth to preach leaving all behind to depend on Him alone, would I be willing to do it?"  I agreed with him that Jesus was the way for all Eternity.

On the way home, I stood at the railway station and weighed matters up.  I knew my Father would be deeply hurt if I gave up my good business, and started out not knowing where my next meal would come from. I then thought who should I obey?  My earthly Father will die sometime, I will have my business, but what about my Heavenly Father? Will He take second place?  I decided He must be first in my life if I wanted to please God. So I went back to Mr. Gill, and we both decided to serve our Heavenly Father.  At one time the devil told me I never would have a convert, but another voice whispered, if I can live my life and be provided for like the early disciples, then I have proved that Jesus was right, and God must come first.

THAT WAS 75 YEARS AGO


Rebuttal To Accusation
that
He
"and a Few Others Started This"

By George Walker

TTT Editor's Note:  The following is reportedly a statement made by George Walker, provided to TTT by an anonymous non-verified source to TTT.  A hard copy sent to TTT of the document this was taken from would be very much appreciated.

"I got an awful disappointment a little while ago. It was from a woman who talked with a woman I knew.  Some people do not talk wisely, saying things to only weaken faith.  The one that wrote was a very true person, and the other had been telling her that myself and a few others started this.  Well, that would be a poor start, wouldn't it?

It is a part of human nature to kind of make a person a hero.   What we did was to encourage people to believe in this Gospel and that this Book could be lived.  No one ever encouraged me to go out and live like the disciples.  When I was in the false way I used to feel that all they had was not like the New Testament.  I will value the person that helped me to believe that this Truth could be lived.  We don't need to tell people that we have some special kind of revelation; that we dug it up out of the earth.  We don't depend on things like that, but we have something that corresponds with the Bible.  If it doesn't correspond with the Bible, it doesn't mean anything.  In the New Testament, there is all that Jesus spoke and lived - isn't that your confidence?  You are not just taken up with the human side.

Some we new failed afterwards themselves.  After we have been out in the harvest field, we can understand what Paul said, "I keep under my body and bring it into subjection lest...I myself should be a castaway."  I am glad I had the wholesome fear in my heart.  One thing that would make him a castaway was that, "I didn't control my body. These appetites - the earthly nature
asserting itself and I could not be used anymore."  It might not mean that I go to a lost eternity, but I could not speak like this anymore.

The devil has not given up hope of getting you yet--he is an angel of light, the cunning one.  Jesus knew him as a real person.  "The prince of this world comes but he has nothing in me."  He always tries to work in something that is wrong.  I recognized that if I didn't get victory over the human I could be a castaway.  Some people got exalted because God used them, and that was what Jesus was warning His disciples about.  He said,  "...you rejoice rather because your names are written in heaven..." .



Meeting at West Hanney, England
July 19-21, 1930
[or at W. Haney's Home in England]

TTT Editor's Notes:  Meeting at West Hanney, England or at W. Haney's Home in England   Statements about this meeting differ in the location where the meeting was held.  Some state that it was at West Hanney; and others state (including The Secret Sect) that it was in W. Haney's home.  West Hanney, England is the nearest town to the convention.   Regardless, the statement circulated about the event quotes what the Secret Sect printed, and the list of individuals present is identical in both statements.

The meeting was called regarding the rift between George Walker and Jack Carroll, co-overseers of the USA and Canada.

The Secret Sect book states at the beginning of Chapter 8:  "The need for a determined and united policy was discussed at a conference held at W. Haney's home in England, 19-21 July, 1930.  An attempt also was made to settle the strained relations between Walker and Carroll, but as no preacher emerged as outright leader, it became apparent that overseers retained and strengthened their right to exercise authority within their territories.  Repetition of former policy was reflected in the statement issued by the seven senior workers after the meeting: July 20, 1930."

The most famous line of the West Hanney Statement is:  "It was unanimously agreed by all present that the past should be buried...". 

This line is often taken out of context to mean that the workers agreed to bury William Irvine's role in founding the 2x2 movement.  To be fair, please read this statement again, very carefully.  Notice the purpose for which the worldwide workers meeting was called at West Hanney.  It was because "difficulties have existed in the U.S.A. between some of the elder workers..."  The difficulty was was the strained relationship between the two U.S.A. overseer workers, Jack Carroll and George Walker.  "The past" had nothing to do with hiding or burying the history of the 2x2 group.  "The past" was the offenses or feud that existed between these two men.  When two people "make up,"  it is often the case that they agree to "let by-gones be by-gones,"  and let the past go.  The West Hanney statement was saying the same thing--that as far as these two men, "the past should be buried."


Statement Regarding Meeting at West Hanney, England
July 19-20, 1930


"For a number of years past, difficulties have existed in the U.S.A. between some of the elder workers, which in recent years became more acute, because of these difficulties it was decided that a number of the elder workers from various countries should come together in England and enquire into the reasons for the trouble and seek to find some basis for a better understanding.

"During the days we (the undersigned) were gathered together, full opportunity was given to all to express their minds and to offer any suggestions that would be helpful.  After considering the matter from every viewpoint, we are happy to say that those who were most concerned in this trouble expressed their deep regret for any offence at which they had been guilty and apologised to each other, and undertook to do all in their power to dispel the existing difficulties and promote the spirit of unity and fellowship amongst the Lord's people, particularly in the fields which were most affected by the trouble.

"It was unanimously agreed by all present that the past should be buried, and that in the future, all would use their influence to discourage anything that would disturb the peace in God's family, adhering to the teaching and example of Jesus.  It was further agreed that should any violation or supposed violation occur, that  no decision should be arrived at or circulated until the matter had been placed before a number of brethren from various countries."

Signed by the following:

W. J. Gill (Willie) 1900
G. Walker (George) 1899
J. T. Carroll (Jack) 1904
J. Hardie (John) 1900
A. Dougal (Alex)
H. R. Mathews (Hugh)1904
J. Twamley
J. Doak (John) 1903
W. Jamieson (Willie) 1905
A. Scott (S.)
J. Jardine (James)1904
J. S. Jackson (Jack) 1901
A. Pearce/Pierce 1904
W. Weir (Willie) 1903
W. Reid (Wilson) 1904
J. Forbes (Jack)


TTT Editor's Note:The most famous line of the West Hanney Statement is: 

"It was unanimously agreed by all present that the past should be buried...". 


This line is often taken out of context to mean that the workers agreed to bury William Irvine's role in founding the 2x2 movement.  To be fair, please read this statement again, very carefully.  Notice the purpose for which the worldwide workers meeting was called at West Hanney.  It was because "difficulties have existed in the U.S.A. between some of the elder workers..."  The difficulty was was the strained relationship between the two U.S.A. overseer workers, Jack Carroll and George Walker.  "The past" had nothing to do with hiding or burying the history of the 2x2 group.  "The past" was the offenses or feud that existed between these two men.  When two people "make up,"  it is often the case that they agree to "let by-gones be by-gones,"  and let the past go.  The West Hanney statement was saying the same thing--that as far as these two men, "the past should be buried."

NOTE: West Hanney, England is the nearest town to the convention.


George Walker's Letter about Black Stockings

2350 East Susquehanna Ave.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania  25

Dear Friends;

A Letter, containing a misleading statement concerning What I  said in a workers’ mtg. regarding black stockings, having been circulated amongst my friends I feel I should write the following:

Over seventeen years ago, a man who did not profess and with whom I was not acquainted came to me at a special mtg, and complained that his wife, who had recently professed, was wearing black stockings at the advice of the sister Worker she had professed through.  Previous to this I had given little thought to the color of hosiery worn by our sisters.  I knew when long dresses were worn it was considered all right to wear different colors.

I talked with some of the older sister workers that I had cause to have a great deal of confidence in.  They believe it would be better for all to wear black.  At Conventions that year I asked this question: “IF all sisters were satisfied in there (sic) minds that their wearing black was pleasing to the lord, Would their doing so hurt the Lord’s work?”  I expressed my opinion that It would not.

I favored black because it was furthermost from the flesh color that many of us believed was unbecoming to “women professing godliness.”  At no time did I say black was the only modest color.  I spoke against the wearing of it being a Condition of Fellowship.  I did not, and I do not, believe using pressure on people, to make them go beyond what is in their heart, or to do what they are not convinced in their minds they should do, is profitable to them or to The Lord’s work.

I am personally acquainted with a  number of sister’s workers and saints who believe it is pleasing to the Lord for them to continue wearing the black they have always worn.  I appreciate their willingness to bear reproach for being true to their convictions.  I have seen other qualities in them that causes me to “esteem them highly.”  I am acquainted with other sisters who believe their wearing other modest colors is pleasing to the Lord.  I have no reason to doubt their tureens (sic) and sincerity.  I have seen in them manifestation of the Spirit of Christ that causes me to “esteem” them highly.”

There are other parts of a woman’s attire that it may be needful to mention.  Is the wearing of a dress that does not come to a reasonable length below the knees, when she is seated, becoming to a “woman professing Godliness”?  The scriptures speak expressly about outward adorning, wearing of gold, plaiting of hair.  We are sometime grieved to see some of our sisters wearing large showy broaches, and we fear the wrist watch, when worn as an adornment especially a gold one, with gold band, is not in keeping with the instructions given in Peters Epistle.  We fear the tendency some of our sisters have to follow the latest fads in arranging their hair does not add weight to their testimony.

During the past few years, we have not said much in conventions or other meetings about the outward appearance.  We have had a strong desire to so speak and act that Love would be increased amongst us.  If we have in our Hearts unfeigned Love for the Lord, we will so Love His work and people that we will be very careful not to hurt His work or cause the weakest amongst His people to stumble by what we wear or do or say.

We will be anxious to excel in Graces and virtues that are mentioned so many times in both Old and New Testament , the forgiving Spirit that enables us to forgive from the heart everyone who has wronged us or in anyway hurt our feelings.  The compassion, the sympathy, the brotherly Love, that enables us to forbear and be patient with all and that causes our Fellowship to be profitable and pleasant.  If we lack these things we cannot “adorn the Doctrine.” Though our outward appearance is correct according to the Scriptures.  Seeing that the Holy Spirit inspired Paul and Peter to mention these things, we should not consider the outward unimportant.  Our unwillingness to “Obey” in this may indicate a rebellious Spirit that  prevents the Lord working in us and us having the condition of Heart and Spirit that in the “sight of God” is of great price.

Recently I have been impressed with the word Servant as used by Paul.  In RV Version it is translated Slave.  We know a slave has little to say regarding what he will do or say or how he will act towards others.  I would like in the future to be more like a faithful slave.

With love and good wishes to all who Love His Name and Way,

Your Servant for Christ’s sake.

George Walker

NOTE:  letter was not dated.


Copy of  Letter from Uncle George Walker (101) received on 3rd Jan '78.
By Thomas Howard Walker (George's nephew)
Tregair Street, Ipswich, Qld 4305 Australia 3.1.78

Philadelphia 79151
December 21 1977

Dear Howard and Eileen

Dorothy sent me your Australian add so I will try and write you a few lines. I hope you are finding the climate and people of Aust pleasant and congenial, it is nice you can be near your children nice for you and for them.

In your last letter to me you asked about our grandparents. All I know is that our grandfather was a soldier in the British Army during the days of Napoleon, at the time of the battle of Waterloo. He may have inherited or purchased the farm your father and I were born on he divided between his two sons, my father and our uncle Tom. There were two houses on it. I was about 6 when he died. I can remember him.

Later our parents bought another small farm that adjoined ours this gave them about 25 acres, and that didn't bring a large yearly income, but they succeeded to rear 10 children, and to give them some education that helped them to make their way in the outside world. We wonder how they did, the land was good for potatoes, and oats, and these were wholesome food. We were never without sufficient food.

I hope all of you enjoy good health, my health keeps good but sight gets worse. I very dim see where or what I am writing, and I can't read what I write. I only write to a very few close friends, and I hope that in spite of all the errors they can read and understand what I mean. Others answer the many other letters I receive and the friends I stay with are very kind and considerate.

You will remember that Jesus in Luke 6 told his Disciples that if they would give freely, as he had given freely to them men would give back to them more than they needed. He gave them the Gospel freely and gave them love and true service. We can rely on his assurances I am proving it is true.

Now you will excuse briefness.
love and good wishes to all

Your Uncle

Geo Walker.

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