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The Journal of John Long
About the Early Days
Newspaper Articles
Read about the Early Days
1893 - 1965
1966 to Present
REPRESENTING THE LARGEST COLLECTION OF 2X2 HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS ON THE INTERNET

Letterhead used by workers titled Christian Conventions

Perry, Oklahoma Conv, 1942

Preserving the Truth
The Church without a Name and its Founder, William Irvine

Introduction Index of Chapters
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Appendixes

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O


Appendix E

Revised March 9, 2017

Background of the West Family
Owners of Crocknacrieve and Mullaghmeen
in Ballinamallard, County Fermanagh, Ireland


The FIRST CROCKNACRIEVE CONVENTION was held in SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1904 in Ballinamallard, County Fermanagh, Ireland (about 4 miles Northeast of Enniskillen, N. Ire.) and lasted around a month.  Baptisms were held in  the Ballinamallard River.  At this time there were 150 workers: 50 in England, 30 in Scotland, 50 in Ireland and 20 in America. (Freeman's Journal, October 14, 1904)

John James West was born in 1872 and died in 1956.  In 1901, John James and Sara (Duff) West purchased Crocknacrieve House ("the hill of the branched tree"),  along with 250 acres the year they were married from Sir Edward Archdale for £2000. All the twelve West children were born at Crocknacrieve House. John West owned a sawmill located in Ballinamallard.

According to the 1911 Irish Census, the names of their first 6 children were: Olivia Rebecca (9), William H. A. (7), John Irvine (6), David Frederick (6) James (4), Albert Victor (1); Their six children born after the 1911 Census were: Meta, Ida, Rhoda, Hazel, Rupert and Ronald. All the twelve West children were born at Crocknacrieve House. John West owned a sawmill located in Ballinamallard.

The earliest building erected at Crocknacrieve was the five-bay section on the east side of the front, dating from circa 1740. The extensive building plan included the main block (three bays of two stories over a basement) and a courtyard comprising stables, loft, coach house, harness room, and two small dwelling houses. Under the coach house block, and on a different level to the yard, there was a range of outhouses including piggeries with vaulted ceilings. In 1817, another building was erected at Crocknacrieve House, and in the 1860’s the Archdales (aka Archdall) added a new wing, raising the roof above the kitchens. Click Here to view photos.

John J. West had one brother, William and four sisters, Emily, Maggie, Ellen and Sarah. They all professed. Emily married William Roberts, Maggie Ellen married John Reid (Gortaloughan) had 3 children;  and Sarah West lived in (Bournemouth, England.)  The West family members supported Ed Cooney when he was excommunicated in 1928.

William Henry West, owned Mullaghmeen situated nearby, the homeplace where John and William grew up. "The West family had originally come from Scotland to County Antrim in 1604, and afterward settled at Pubble, near Tempo. Later they moved to Mullaghmeen where...William and...John were born and spent their childhood...Harry West [son of Wm. West] grew up on the family farm at Mullaghmeen, about two miles from the village, where his father William had an extensive holding of several hundred acres." (From: Ballinamallard--A Place of Importance, Ballinamallard Historical Society, 2004). The Convention was moved to Mullaghmeen after John West sold Crocknacrieve in 1921.  

William West was born in 1870 and died April 30, 1395. On the 1901 Census of Ireland, William was 31 years old, unmarried, head of family living at Mullaghmeen with his mother Rebecca (60), and five siblings. 

In the 1911 Census of Ireland, William was still single (41) and he along with his mother, and sister Sarah (31) were living at Mullaghmeen.  William married Harriet Spence and their surviving children were:  Henry (better known as Harry), Ruby, Mary, Joan, Noelle and Eithne, none of whom were members of the 2x2s (who are called Reidites in Co. Fermanagh) nor did they support Cooney after he was excommunicated. Ruby married Cecil Ferguson (Enniskillen); Mary married William Moore (Enniskillen); Joan married Hugh Gaw (Belfast);  Noelle married Ian Cooper (Enniskillen); and Eithne married Dr. Liam Jones (England).

Ruby Ferguson said in an interview: "My father [William West] was a good Christian man who helped so many of his neighbours...Time without number he helped struggling farmers with the result that, when he died in 1935, aged 65, he left a large farm but little money. At this time Harry was taken from Portora where he was a weekly boarder and trained by his uncles to run the farm.  Ruby left the Collegiate to learn shorthand and typing and worked in Enniskillen Court House." ( Impartial Reporter, June 26, 2008*)

In 1921, John and Sara West moved to Rossahilly, a larger place not far away.  They bought Rossahilly from the same man who sold them Crocknacrieve, Sir Edward M. Archdale. And the Wests sold Crocknacrieve to Simon Christopher and Penelope "Penny" (Barton) Loane, parents of the late Warren Loane.  

Penny (Barton) Loane, was an early worker, and one of the first workers to go to Switzerland. The Impartial Reporter stated in their July 9, 1914, issue regarding the Crocknacrieve convention, that "Two preachers, one of whom is Miss Barton, Pettigo, have lately returned from North Italy and Switzerland.” She is shown in America on the Location of Workers after 1912-13 Conventions.

The earliest building erected at Crocknacrieve is the five bay portion on the east side of the front, dating from circa 1740. The extensive building plan included the main block (three bays of two stories over a basement) and a courtyard comprising stables, loft, coach house, harness room, and two small dwelling houses. Under the coach house block, and on a different level to the yard, there was a range of outhouses including piggeries with vaulted ceilings. In 1817 another building was erected at Crocknacrieve House, and in the 1860’s the Archdales (aka Archdall) added a new wing raising the roof above the kitchens. Click Here to view photos. Click Here to view all previous owners of Crocknacrieve.

"Although documentary evidence is scarce, it is thought that a Patrick Hurst once lived there, because after his death aged 69 on 10 June 1797, the Reverend Alexander Hurst, son of John Hurst, a merchant from Ballinamallard, sold the house to John Johnston who became Clerk of the Crown for Northwest Ulster. Born in 1775, he married Mary Jane Ovenden, daughter of Dr. Charles Ovenden of Enniskillen. He died in 1831, and in 1834 his widow married Henry Mervyn Richardson, great grandparents of the present owner, Warren Loane. Mr. & Mrs. Richardson lived at Crocknacrieve until 1842, at which time they inherited Rossfad and went to live there. Mrs. Richardson’s brother, the Reverend Thomas Ovenden, also lived at Crocknacrieve when he became Rector of Magheracross in 1838. He died suddenly in 1846. After 1846 Crocknacrieve was leased to various people...until it was sold by Henry Richardson to his first cousin, Nicholas Archdale in the late 1850’s." And then, John West purchased Crocknacrieve from Edward Mervyn Archdale, son of Nicholas Archdale, in 1901. (From: Ballinamallard--A Place of Importance, Ballinamallard Historical Society, 2004)

The following narrative is based on a talk Harry West, son of William West and nephew of John West, gave to the Historical Society in 1996, as reported by Mervyn Dane:

“Although my Uncle John [West] was a bit of a rebel and refused to go to school, he took steps to educate himself and became quite successful at buying farms and property. He made friends with Nicholas Archdale, one of the Archdales of Castle Archdale, who owned the large house and lands of Crocknacrieve, and he eventually bought the farm for very little money.

"During the First World War when timber was in urgent demand he made a large amount of money by selling trees from the extensive woodlands of Crocknacrieve. He also became a follower of the famous preacher, Edward Cooney, and in the years that followed large conventions attended by thousands of worshippers were held annually at Crocknacrieve. At this time Harry West, still in his boyhood, helped the men to round up the sheep at Mullaghmeen and they told him that the sheep were going to be slaughtered to feed the people at Crocknacrieve convention.” 

“In addition to Crocknacrieve, John West bought and sold a number of large farms in different parts of County Fermanagh. One of these was Jamestown House at Magheracross, which he sold to my father, William. As well as farming at Mullaghmeen, my father was Secretary of Fermanagh County Council. He loved Jamestown, or thought he did, and prepared to take up residence there. He had the family, livestock and machinery all moved there from Mullaghmeen. Unfortunately for him, on the last day going home from his office in Enniskillen, he called in at Mullaghmeen. He went into the deserted kitchen and looked around. Being a sentimental sort of person, a feeling gripped him and he changed his mind and did not go to Jamestown. He immediately ordered his wife and family and all the livestock and machinery back to Mullaghmeen.”

“My father then sold Jamestown to a farmer called Strain from Boyle, County Roscommon, going security for him at the bank. Strain farmed it for a short time, but did not have the finance to run it properly. My father took the farm back again and handed it over to me. Then a sudden challenge was presented to me at a young age. While I was in my last year at Portora my father died. I was the eldest of the family of five girls which meant that I had to take responsibility. My father had wanted to see the farm well run above all else and see it as a model farm in the area.” A few years later Harry West became closely involved with the development of the Ulster Farmer’s Union...."

John Long wrote: "John West, Crocknacrieve, Ballinamallard, near Enniskillen, gave his premises for a Convention that year. William Irvine had newly returned from the United States; and was in good form. The weather was very fine during the whole month; which suited the camps set up for the saints and workers to sleep in.

"Many of the workers were troubled with a skin disease. Irvine got them separated and treated according to the need of the case and delt (sic) very mercifully with them. Cleanliness was one of the subjects delt (sic) with and emphasized. A great effort was made at every conference to put up both workers and friends free of charge; and all who had learned trades such as bakers, and butchers; their services were utilized on the occasion. Full sanitary arrangements were made beforehand; there were no appeals for money; and no public collections; the strength and fruits of the teaching produced the necessary money, which was given freely to defray the expenses, which amounted to nearly fifteen hundred pounds; including the passages of those who went foreign.

"Perhaps no movement of modern days gave so much preeminence to reading the Bible; and circulating them; and every worker was prone to spend much time in private prayer. Flirting or courting was not allowed; and the flesh or selfish life strongly condemned. Marriage was not forbidden; yet the unmarried life was commended as the freest for workers. The necessity of keeping prophet's chambers and entertaining strangers was strongly set forth. At the close of the conference, every worker threw his or her money into one common purse; then it was equally divided on departing to the varied districts and fields of labour. At that convention Irvine warned the workers of speaking against men of God, such as J. G. Govan; it would have been much better and wiser for the testimony if that advice had been attended to, but Satan has ever used this tactic to drive men into extremes and by so doing spoil their testimony; and God can and does set aside one movement, and raises up another. No two Revivals are the same, but it’s the same Word of God, and the same Holy Spirit, and the same precious Blood, applied by faith to the soul that gives men and women the experience of peace and that produces the revivals of His word and work; this revival chapter may vary in details from the former.


Ballinamallard Methodist Church   
December 14, 1903   
Quarterly Meeting

The foll. letter was passed unceremoniously and entered on the minutes.  It was directed that a copy be sent to Mr. John West, Crocknacrieve.
~~~~~~~~~~~

The brethren view with intense regret the entire absence of Bro. John West from the public worship of God in the Church in which he holds the important dual office of Leader & Local preacher.  The brethren also notice his irregular attendance at the Circuit Quarterly meeting, showing a lack of interest in the work. 

They wish to convey to him in the kindest spirit that they consider his treatment of the public worship of his own church neither brotherly nor christian, & calculated to be a bad example to the unconverted. Bro. West has the good wishes and prayers of the Bros. but they are compelled to say that he should take a practical sympathetic interest in the Meth. Church so long as he remains a member of it. 

The Brethren wish to know definitely before the next Quarterly meeting if he will fulfil the requirements attached to the offices mentioned above viz: loyalty to the Meth. Church; attendance at its public worship; & a faithful fulfilment of his duties as an official.  In the meantime the board has appointed Bro. James Winters as his co-worker in Larafh(?) Class.

14th December 1903


Trail of Ownership of Crocknacrieve Convention Grounds,
Ballinamallard, Fermanagh County, Ireland

FROM: Patrick Hurst: "Although documentary evidence is scarce, it is thought that a Patrick Hurst once lived there, because after his death aged 69 on 10 June 1797, the Reverend Alexander Hurst, son of John Hurst, a merchant from Ballinamallard…”

TO: “…sold the house to John Johnston who became Clerk of the Crown for Northwest Ulster. Born in 1775, he married Mary Jane Ovenden, daughter of Dr. Charles Ovenden of Enniskillen. He died in 1831...”

TO: “… and in 1834 his [John Johnston’s] widow married Henry Mervyn Richardson, [grandparents of Simon Loane who would purchase the property in 1921] Mr. & Mrs. Richardson lived at Crocknacrieve until 1842, at which time they inherited Rossfad and went to live there.”

TO: “After 1846 Crocknacrieve was leased to various people...until it was sold by Henry Richardson to his first cousin, Nicholas Archdale in the late 1850’s." Nicholas Montgomery Archdale was born February 18, 1820 and died February 2, 1877 at age 56 in the hunting field. He was the son of Edward Archdall and Matilda Humphrys. On January 27, 1852, Nicholas married Adelaide Mary Porter, 4th daughter of Rev John Grey Porter and Margaret Lavinia Lindsey; she died January 6, 1926.

TO: Eldest Son Edward Mervyn Archdale who was born January 26, 1853 and died November 1, 1943 at age 90. He married Alicia Bland Fleming, daughter of Quintin Fleming, on June 10, 1880.

TO: John West purchased Crocknacrieve in 1901 from Sir Edward M. Archdale, son of Nicholas Archdale who died in 1877. Some sources state he bought it from Nicholas Archdale, but this was not possible, since he was deceased long before 1901.

TO: Simon Christopher Loane purchased Crocknacrieve from John West in 1921. Simon C. Loane was born October 22, 1883 and died on August 6, 1971. He married Mildred Penelope (“Penny”) Matilda Barton on Aug 27, 1918. She was the 5 th and 8 th child of daughter of Capt. Charles Robert Barton and Henrietta Martha Mervyn Richardson of Waterfoot, Letter Co. Fermanagh. Penny was born on April 25, 1885 in Pettigo, Co Fermanagh and died on August 6, 1971 . NOTE: Penny Barton and her sister Susie (9 th child) were both 2x2 workers. Penny went with Maggie Johnston to Switzerland in 1913. She left the work and married Simon Loane in 1918 and they had 4 sons. Her sister Susan Cecil(e) Grace Barton was born December 24, 1886 and died March 2, 1968; Susie was a lifetime 2x2 worker.

TO: Eldest son: Simon Folliott Warren Thomas Barton Loane was born on August 16, 1920 and died Feb 5, 2007 (View Death Notice: http://notices.irishtimes.com/2393302 )
He married his cousin Heather Everina Anne Mackey on August 4, 1955. She was the only daughter of Capt. David Mackey and his wife Heather (Maxwell) of Drumlyon, Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh. They had two children: Charles David Montgomery Loane born November 14, 1956; and Erica Everina Penelope Loane born April 30, 1959. Erica married Sir Edmund John William Hugh Ramsay-Fairfax-Lucy , the 6th Baronetm and became Lady Ramsay-Fairfax-Lucy. They have a son Patrick Samuel Thomas Fulke Ramsay-Fairfax-Lucy, born at Warwick on April 3, 1995.

TO: Heather Everina Anne (Mackey) Loane, in February, 2007.

Sources for above:
Ballinamallard--A Place of Importance, Ballinamallard Historical Society, 2004;
Burke’s Irish Family Records
thePeerage.com


From: Peter Archdale, a great-grandson of the 1st Baronet: http://lordbelmontinnorthernireland.blogspot.com/2010/08/riversdale.html

"As far as I know, Riversdale was built sometime between 1800 and 1817 by Edward Archdale (above), 3 rd son of Mervyn Archdall and Hon. Mary Dawson . He died in 1864, when the property passed to his second son William Humphrys Mervyn Archdall (below left). The latter dsp in 1889, so the house and land passed to his nephew, my g-grandfather Edward Mervyn Archdale. Edward Mervyn Archdale farmed Riversdale and also had large farms at Rossahilly and Crocknacrieve - almost 1,000 acres. His original estate was 5,300 acres and he was one of the first landlords to sell to his tenants. He moved to his late uncle's house at Riversdale in 1897, but during the five years 1898-1903 while he represented North Fermanagh, he rented a house in Warwick Square for his family. During his later service as an MP, he also maintained a house in 36 Belgrave Road, SW. He sold Crocknacrieve and about 250 acres of land to John West, uncle of Harry West, for £2000 who in turn sold it to the Loanes in 1921. John West then bought Rossahilly."

From: Burke's "Guide to Country Houses, Ireland" Vol. 1 by Mark Bence-Jones, Ireland, published 1978, heading “Crocknacrieve.”

"This Archdale family were also associated with another country house - Crocknacrieve, Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh. A Georgian house, built by Capt. John Johnston, whose widow married H.M. Richardson, of Rossfad; who, when he inherited the latter estate, and part of Rich Hill, handed Crocknacrieve over to his cousin, Nicholas Archdale, who added a wing, said to have been built with stone from the old Folliott castle in Ballinamallard.  Sir Edward Archdale sold the property 1901; in 1921 it was bought by S.C. Loane, whose wife (nee Barton) was the grand-daughter of H. M. Richardson."

For Crocknacrieve ownership, see also this book: Burke’s Irish Family Records by Bernard Burke
Headings: Loane, Archdale, Richardson.  NOTE: The Wests do not appear in this book.

The Ballinamallard Historical Society has posted an informative self Walking Tour of the Village 

Also the Village History of Ballinamallard.


Sara West Statement
About The 1928 Division, August 31, 1954

Ida West Testimony August, 1954

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The Church without a Name
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William Irvine
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